4 Brand New Face Filler Options You Should Know About Right Now

The differences between fillers are sometimes big and sometimes subtle, but each one has its own unique characteristics. From how long they last and what they’re made of to where they’re best placed for maximum results, there’s a lot to know about each one as more options continue to become available and new indications are FDA-approved. Here, the latest happenings in the world of fillers available at your expert injector’s office now.

Radiesse adds Radiesse(+)

We know the long-lasting, collagen-stimulating filler Radiesse is made of calcium hydroxyapatite gel and that it can last from a year to 18 months, so how does its new companion filler Radiesse (+) differ? The original Radiesse is approved to treat deep wrinkles, like the nasolabial folds, and the newly approved Radiesse (+) is best suited for the jawline, says San Francisco dermatologist Amelia Hausauer, MD. “Just as collagen declines over time, we lose bone mass including in the jawline and chin, meaning the tablecloth, or our skin, can be too large for the table or the bone structure,” she explains. “It makes sense to build back and contour this region with a calcium-based filler just like the bone it is recreating. Radiesse (+) is stiff enough to give natural appearing results and also has biostimulatory effects, meaning it amplifies the body’s own production of collagen and elastin fibers long term.”

Welcome the New RHA Redensity for Lips

Adding to the lip enhancement options is RHA, who have created the latest filler to be approved for the lips— joining Juvéderm Volbella and Restylane Kysse as the go-to lip plumpers—with lasting results from nine months to a year. “This is a relatively new dermal filler produced by a Swiss company,” says Chicago plastic surgeon Sam Speron, MD. “The manufacturing process is different and gentler than other hyaluronic acid fillers.”

“This is a good product to increase volume for the lips,” adds West Palm Beach, FL dermatologist Kenneth Beer, MD. “It has a nice duration and it is soft and looks natural.”

Sculptra Gets a New Indication

The FDA recently expanded Sculptra’s approved use for treating fine lines and wrinkles with a new label that allows for more treatment possibilities. “Sculptra is a non-dissolvable filler made of poly-L-lactic acid, a substance similar to that of dissolvable sutures, which works to amplify the body’s own collagen production mechanisms,” says Dr. Hausauer. These changes occur over 6-12 or more weeks and usually require several sessions but by placing a stimulatory filler under the skin, it can slowly work to improve tone, texture and crepiness. Dr. Beer adds that this really isn’t a game-changing update, but those with medium deep wrinkles benefit most from Sculptra’s new indication and label change.

Juvéderm Voluma Becomes First Official Under-Eye Filler

While off-label under-eye filler has been performed for years, it only recently got FDA approval and the first filler to be granted the honor is Voluma. “This is the first filler FDA-approved for the under-eye area and personally, Juvederm is my favorite injectable,” says Dr. Speron. “I love that it’s clear, can easily be reversed with hyaluronidase and the syringes provided by the company for injection are very smooth and easy to control.”

The under-eye area is considered one of the “danger zones” for injectable treatments, so although this approval may legitimize the practice of treating tear troughs with filler, it is not without its risks. “It is worth noting that tear troughs are an advanced area for treatment and you must see an expert injector who has a lot of experience in order to avoid getting blue discoloration, puffiness or other undesired results,” notes Dr. Hausauer. “Find a board-certified dermatologist or other highly credentialed provider who is familiar with this region and you can achieve the most elegant and refreshed results.”

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